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Malaysian featherweight phenom Keanu Subba is eager to prove how far he has come in his mixed martial arts journey at ONE: FOR HONOR in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Subba admitted it wasn’t the easiest of training camps, but with a burning desire to prove he belongs at the top of the featherweight ladder, the athlete has thoroughly studied his past victories and defeats.

Two bouts which remain close to his heart are the losses he suffered against Li Kai Wen in 2016 and Christian Lee in 2017.

“I’ve surely grown a lot since these matches, more so since the match against Christian Lee,” the 24-year-old confidently said.

“Against Christian, I felt that I had a high output in the first round and that left me a bit gassed out at the end of the bell. I did well on the feet too, but I could have been more efficient.

“Since that defeat, I realized if your Plan A fails, you need a Plan B or a Plan C. The most important thing for an athlete is to be dominant over possession. If you fail to put the match to bed, try another tactic, although you have to start all over again.”

With that lesson in mind, Subba finished his next two opponents in style inside the opening stanza.

The first came via armbar, and the second one via guillotine choke, both happening last year.

“I had a specific game plan against Xie Chao and Phoe Thaw, and although it wasn’t what I thought it would be, I managed to come up with another tactic,” Subba explains.

“When I’ve got a choke, I tend not to squeeze for more than 10 seconds. If I fail, I’ll switch to another submission attempt.”

Come Friday, 3 May, the two-time MIMMA Champion said he’ll take his performance a notch higher against Japanese martial artist Ryogo Takahashi.

Subba knows he will be pushed to the limit by his more experienced opponent, but that only motivates him in his quest for victory.

“We all know he’s a veteran of the sport with 14 fights, so he’s got a lot of experience on his side. He’s a good striker, but he doesn’t seem to get to the ground much,” the Kuala Lumpur native explained.

“Striking is his strength, but I don’t see him beating me on the feet. If it goes to the ground, I’m confident I’ll submit him. I’m better in both departments.”